Bronze and Iron Age Human Remains from the Sculptor’s Cave

Archaeological and historical research on cultures with potential links to Indo-European peoples.
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cquiles
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Bronze and Iron Age Human Remains from the Sculptor’s Cave

Post by cquiles » Fri Aug 18, 2017 5:34 pm

Death, Decapitation and Display? The Bronze and Iron Age Human Remains from the Sculptor’s Cave, Covesea, North-east Scotland, by Ian Armit, Rick Schulting, Christopher J. Knüsel, and Ian A.G. Shepherd, Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society 77, 2011, pp. 251–278.

https://www.academia.edu/1377478/Death_ ... E_Scotland
Excavations at the Sculptor’s Cave (north-east Scotland) during the 1930s and 1970s yielded evidence for activity in the Late Bronze Age, Late Iron Age,and early medieval periods, including a substantial human skeletal assemblage with apparent evidence for the removal, curation, and display of human heads. The present project, combining osteological analysis and a programme of AMS dating, aimed to place the surviving human remains from the site into their appropriate chronological context and to relate them to the broader sequence of human activity in the cave. A series of AMS determinations has demonstrated that the human remains fall into two distinct chronological groups separated by a millennium or more: one from the Mid–Late Bronze Age and one from the Late Iron Age. Osteological analysis suggests that while the Bronze Age group may, as previously suggested, include the remains of the heads of juveniles formerly displayed at the cave entrance, this was not the sole mechanism by which human remains arrived in the cave at this time. The Late Iron Age group provides evidence for decapitation and other violent treatments within the cave itself.
We know from the genetic paper of Olalde et al. (2017) that Indo-European speakers of R1b-L21 lineages had already arrived to this region by the early Bronze Age.
Carlos Quiles - Academia Prisca

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